GWF2021 – On-demand videos

You can find links to all on-demand content in the schedule below. 

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Conference Schedule

Day 1

Movie and Lunch Networking


Grab your lunch and watch a movie!

We’ve partnered with Water Docs Film Festival to bring your lunchtime entertainment. All you need to do is log in to Airmeet for 12:45pm and the film will play automatically on your screen.

*If you missed the live screening on Monday, you can still watch the film here. VIEW FILM

We are showing the water documentary, The Canoe.

Specs: CANADA | 2017 | 27 min

Filmmaker: Goh Iromoto

Synopsis: Canoe captures the bond between human and nature created by Canada’s well-known watercraft and water symbol – the canoe. Through the stories of five canoeists paddling through different parts of Ontario, the film – gorgeously lyrical in visual composition and narration – underscores the strength of the human spirit and how the canoe can be a vessel for creating deep and meaningful connection.

Note: The film will be available for on demand screening throughout the duration of the conference.

Brought to you by:

Water Docs is an annual film festival hosted by Ecologos, a diverse group of volunteers and staff who are passionate about the well-being of water and climate. To engage people in water issues, shape attitudes and motivate action, Ecologos weaves together three ingredients: documentary storytelling and the arts, experiential learning, and channelling the resulting inspiration into specific water projects. These strands together help change attitudes and connect people to ways to protect water and climate in everyday life.

Join Water Docs November 1 - 7, 2021 for
ReSurge: Canadian Film Festivals for a Liveable Climate
www.waterdocs.ca




Live Poster Session


Join us for a virtual version of the GWF2021 scientific poster session! Browse through the posters that highlight our scientific research from across the GWF program and the conference’s five main themes. You will be able to enter a live chat room with poster authors for one-on-one discussions, , or leave a comment or a message for the poster author. Click here to view today’s featured posters and enter the chat rooms Click here for Day 2 posters Click here for Day 3 posters

Posters will be available for viewing throughout the entire GWF2021 conference.




PARALLEL SESSION 1 – The Vulnerability and Resilience of Northern Ecosystems to Change


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Session conveners: Jennifer Baltzer (Wilfrid Lauer University), Sean Carey (McMaster University)

Conference theme: Climate-driven changes of water environments in cold regions

Overview:

Climate change is occurring faster in Canada’s north than virtually anywhere else on earth and is having a profound impact on biophysical processes. Rapid changes in vegetation, precipitation phase and timing along with ecosystem disturbances, such as wildfire and permafrost thaw, all act to impact the function of northern ecosystems. While some ecosystems are resilient or resistant to change, evidence suggests that many are shifting to new states. This interdisciplinary session will provide insights into how changes to northern regions will affect integrated environmental responses. We are particularly interested in the impacts of permafrost thaw and ecosystem change on northern communities and stakeholders. We welcome discussion on studies that use field-based, remote sensing and models, or some combination thereof, to advance our understanding and ability to predict the of changing function of vulnerable northern regions.

Agenda and Speakers:

1:30pm: Welcoming Remarks and Housekeeping. Chairs: Sean Carey, McMaster University; Jenn Baltzer, Wilfrid Laurier University.

1:35pm: Diversity and dynamics of permafrost landscapes in a warming world. Steve Kokelj, NWT Geological Survey.

1:50pm: Trajectories of rapid vegetation change in a warming Arctic. Isla Myers-Smith, University of Edinburgh.

2:05pm: Fire and ice - shifts in boreal ecosystem structure and function in response to increasing wildfire and permafrost thaw. Catherine Dieleman, University of Guelph.

2:15pm: Hydrological Implications of treeline advance and shrubification in a subarctic, alpine catchment, Yukon Territory, Canada. Erin Nicholls, McMaster University.

2:25pm: Icings and Winter Hydrology in Permafrost Regions. Tim Ensom, Wilfrid Laurier University.

2:35pm: Lake-Catchment Interactions: Brownification and Fish Response. Mehdi Moslemi Aqdam, University of Waterloo.

2:45pm: TBC. Anthony Bier, Yukon Government.

2:55pm: Q&A and discussion.




GWF-YP Workshop – Mental Wellness


The GWF-YP team will be hosting a workshop focused on mental wellness and the difficulties of undertaking graduate studies during a global pandemic. Completing a graduate degree, though fulfilling, presents many challenges that too often result in stress, anxiety and burnout. With the added stress of a global pandemic, and the adjustment to working from home, it is time that we talk about it! Ashley Breland, a Mental Health First Aid Facilitator from the University of Saskatchewan will cover a variety of mental health subjects including emotional boundaries, toxic positivity and resiliency. During Ashley’s presentation there will be polled questions so that the audience can share their perspectives. Afterwards, YP’s will be briefed on the Headspace app, a wellness app that provides users with tools to improve their mental health through mindfulness, sleep quality and physical exercises.

We welcome all conference attendees to join us for this workshop!

3:30pm: Introduction.

3:35pm: Presentation from Ashley Breland, Mental Health First Aid Facilitator, University of Saskatchewan.

4:10pm: Tools and solutions / intro to Headspace.

4:20pm: Questions and wrap-up.




Opening


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Join us for the Opening of GWF2021! We will open the 3-day conference and welcome attendees to our event.

Chair: Philippe Van Cappellen, University of Waterloo

Indigenous Opening: Elder Roland Duquette, Mistawasis First Nation

Remarks by:

Baljit Singh, Vice-President Research, University of Saskatchewan

Charmaine Dean, Vice-President Research & International, University of Waterloo

Valérie Laflamme, Associate Vice-President, Tri-Agency Institutional Program Secretariat




PARALLEL SESSION 2 – Moving from Watersheds to Sewersheds: Next Generation Solutions for COVID-19 surveillance


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Session conveners: Mark Servos (University of Waterloo), John Giesy (University of Saskatchewan)

Conference theme: From anthropogenic pressures to ecosystem services

Overview:

The COVID-19 pandemic has touched almost every corner of the globe and caused serious health impacts within our communities. It was recognized early in the “first wave” of infections that there was the potential to monitor SARS-CoV-2 viral fragments in wastewater as an alternate way to do community surveillance. This approach has the advantage that it is independent of how testing is done for individuals over time (i.e. changing methods, access), integrates both symptomatic and asymptomatic people and included everyone within the sewershed. It therefore represents an additional tool for supporting public health interventions and management. The GWF Next Generations Solutions Project, with support from several elements of GWF, rapidly responded to the needs of the public health agencies by pivoting research from environmental DNA (biomonitoring) and toxicology to assessment of SARS-CoV-2 in wastewater. Regular sampling of influent (wastewater) initiated at several wastewater sites in Ontario and Saskatchewan has shown wastewater surveillance as useful tool to track community spread that parallels closely the reported clinical cases. Wastewater is also emerging as a way to rapidly monitor the spread of variants of concern (VOCs) in our communities. This work has been used by local authorities to inform and support public health actions to protect our communities.

Agenda and Speakers:

1:30pm – 2:50pm:

Prof. Mark Servos, University of Waterloo – Responding to public health needs of a global pandemic

Prof. John Giesy, University of Saskatchewan – Shifting from environmental toxicology to SARS-CoV-2 wastewater surveillance

Mr. Hadi Dhiyebi, University of Waterloo – Responding to a global pandemic: SARS-CoV-2 wastewater surveillance in Ontario

Dr. Meghan Fuzzen, University of Waterloo – Rapid detection of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern in Ontario wastewater

Dr. Yuwei Xie, University of Saskatchewan – Monitoring for SARS-CoV-2 and variants of concern in Saskatchewan wastewater

Dr. Chand Mangat, National Microbiology Lab, Public Health Agency of Canada – Wastewater surveillance for SARS-CoV-2: A Canadian Perspective

2:50pm – 3:00pm: Questions and discussion.




PARALLEL SESSION 3 – From Modelling to Management, Policy & Practice - Case Studies from Global Water Futures


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Session conveners: Karl-Erich Lindenschmidt (University of Saskatchewan), Saman Razavi (University of Saskatchewan)

Conference theme: Turning research into policy and management solutions

Overview:

GWF has made significant progress towards developing and improving modelling technologies for prediction and forecasting of water-related risks across Canada. From the fundamental modeling capacity delivered by the Core Forecasting and Modelling Team, to application-specific modelling advances pursued in projects such as the Integrated Modelling Program for Canada, there are many examples of modelling contributions to improved management, policy and practice outcomes across GWF. This session will highlight these examples in a series of case studies co-presented by researchers and collaborators from Canadian businesses, governments, and organizations. Case studies will review major modelling advances since the inception of GWF and highlight how these have contributed to new management regimes, planning exercises and operations policy to reduce water-related threats in Canada’s major river basins.

Agenda and Speakers:

1:30pm: Introduction

1:35pm: Predicting River Ice Jams, the “Black-Box” of Flood Forecasting. Karl-Erich Lindenschmidt, University of Saskatchewan; Bin Luo, Manitoba Infrastructure. GWF Project: Integrated Modelling Program for Canada and Global Water Futures Core Modelling

1:53pm: The eye of the culvert: improving prairie infrastructure through new modelling. Kevin Shook, University of Saskatchewan; Katherine Finn, North Saskatchewan River Basin Council. GWF Project: Prairie Water.

2:11pm: Development and implementation of a hydrological monitoring program for lakes of the Peace-Athabasca Delta. Laura Neary, University of Waterloo; Paul Zorn, Parks Canada. GWF Project: Northern Water Futures.

2:29pm: Water resources modelling for improved reservoir operation in Manitoba. Masoud Asadzadeh, University of Manitoba; Kevin Gawne, Manitoba Hydro. GWF Project: Integrated Modelling Program for Canada.

2:47pm: Managing Nutrient Legacies for Water Quality Improvement. Nandita Basu, University of Waterloo.




PARALLEL SESSION 4 – Sensors and Observations


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Session conveners: Claude Duguay (University of Waterloo), David Rudolph (University of Waterloo), Ravi Selvaganapthy (McMaster University)

Conference theme: Innovations in water science and technology

Overview:

Canada’s water resources are vast and span an enormous range in geography, climate and ecosystems. Understanding and adapting to short and long-term water threats in the face of climate change requires a transformative enhancement to the way environmental data are collected and communicated. One of Global Water Futures (GWF) sponsored Pillar 3 project, “Transformative sensor Technologies and Smart Watersheds for Canadian Water Futures (TTSW)”, aims to deliver these enhancements through collaboration with industry and government in order to develop, test, and implement various technologies for monitoring water quality and quantity. This includes remote sensing and modeling techniques, as well as “smart” sensor communication modems intended to deliver valuable environmental data in near-real time. The development of these tools and techniques will offer end-user communities enhanced methods to collect and deliver important environmental data from multiple scales. The end-user communities who will benefit from the key deliverables of this project include technology developers, government agencies, natural resource industries, and the overall water research community.

This session will consist of a set of invited, regular and lightning talks covering recent developments and future prospects in remote sensing technology (field, drone, airborne, and satellite-based) and retrieval algorithms/modeling of parameters related to water quality and quantity. Speakers will include GWF-associated researchers, HQP and stakeholders.

Agenda and speakers:

1:30pm: Opening. Co-chairs: Nastaran Saberi, University of Waterloo; Vinay Patel, McMaster University.

1:35pm: Keynote Talk: Remote sensing of Canadian water resources: emerging trends and opportunities. Jay Famiglietti, University of Saskatchewan.

1:55pm: Implication of hyperspectral imaging in the Canadian Water Microsatellite Mission Concept. Kiana Zolfaghari, University of Waterloo.

2:10pm: Development of the Terrestrial Snow Mass Mission. Chris Derksen, Environment and Climate Change Canada.

2:25pm: Metal ion preconcentration and detection using superabsorbent polymers for water monitoring. Ravi Selvaganapthai, McMaster University.

2:40pm: Advances in resolving snow-vegetation interactions with UAV-lidar remote sensing. Philip Harder, University of Saskatchewan.

2:55pm: Discussion.




PARALLEL SESSION 5 – Best Practices in Indigenous Community Water Research


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Session conveners: Dawn Martin-Hill (McMaster University), Lawrence Martz (University of Saskatchewan)

Session theme: Knowledge co-creation with Indigenous communities

Overview:

These sessions seek to highlight the lessons learned and best practices involved with conducting Indigenous knowledge and community-led research that is co-created by both academic and community leads. By drawing on the current GWF Indigenous research projects, the sessions will feature the realities of conducting co-creation research with Indigenous communities. Real-world takeaways from ongoing projects will advance Indigenous knowledge research and lead towards a water-secure future for Indigenous communities. Successful partnerships with Indigenous communities include co-creation of the study design, centering community leadership in the implementation of data collection, appropriately training youth and graduate students, co-creating knowledge mobilization dissemination tools, and the optimization of traditional ecological knowledge for environmental and human health outcomes. As the first of three sessions, this session will discuss best practices in Indigenous community water research, highlighting examples from the Ohneganos: Indigenous ecological knowledge, training and co-creation of mixed method tools and Water knowledge camps: building capacity for cross-cultural water knowledge, research, and environmental monitoring projects. True partnership requires mutual respect and trust, and when achieved, both academic researchers and the community will benefit.

Agenda and Speakers:

1:30pm: Welcoming remarks. Chair: Dawn Martin-Hill, McMaster University, Mohawk Nation.

1:40pm: Remarks from Traditional Knowledge Keeper. Judy Da Silva, Asubpeeschoseewagong Netum Anishinabek (Grassy Narrows First Nation).

1:50pm: Remarks from GWF Knowledge Co-Creation Community and Academic Experts.

Lori Davis Hill, Six Nations Health Services (Ohneganos: Indigenous ecological knowledge, training and co-creation of mixed method tools)

Leon Andrew and Walter Bezha (Water knowledge camps: building capacity for cross-cultural water knowledge, research, and environmental monitoring)

Rudo Kemper, Digital Democracy (Ohneganos: Indigenous ecological knowledge, training and co-creation of mixed method tools)

2:20pm: Summarizing remarks. Chair: Dawn Martin-Hill, McMaster University.

2:30pm. Open dialogue.




Morning Plenary with Keynote Talk


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This session will feature an update on the Global Water Futures program provided by Dr. John Pomeroy, Director of the program, and will be followed by a talk by Keynote Speaker Dr. Elena Bennett, Professor and Canada Research Chair in Sustainability Science at McGill University.

Chair: Philippe Van Cappellen, University of Waterloo

Global Water Futures: Progress, Challenges and Prospects

Dr. John Pomeroy, Director, Global Water Futures

Dr. Pomeroy will provide an update on the Global Water Futures program with highlights from the past year, including successes and challenges, pandemic impacts, and integrating EDI. Dr. Pomeroy will look to the future and what’s on the horizon as to what we can do together next as the Global Water Futures research community.

(Another) Ten Thousand Years of Agriculture and Water

Dr. Elena Bennett, McGill University

Creating a sustainable and just future will require a major shift in how humans live in, and interact with, the Earth system. But how this shift will take place, and the pathways it will follow, remain vague. Further, visions of sustainable futures differ widely. Inspirational visions can be a key component of transformations to sustainability, helping to shape the very reality that they forecast. But thus far, the global change community has produced very few positive visions of more desirable, just, and sustainable futures for society and nature, or how these might be achieved. How can we think about a better future, how can we measure it, and how can we grow back stronger and more resilient from the pandemic? In this talk, Dr. Elena Bennett will discuss efforts to develop a suite of alternative, plausible visions of futures that are socially and ecologically desirable by identifying elements of a Good Anthropocene that already exist, and will show how the science of ecosystem services can be used to assess them. She will focus on phosphorus and its role in water quality to explore how slow variables, long-term legacies, and thresholds influence our ability to plan for an uncertain future.





Day 2

Morning Plenary with Keynote Talks


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Join us for this morning plenary featuring two talks by Keynote Speakers Ms. Chelsea Lobson, Programs Director of the Lake Winnipeg Foundation, and Prof. Danika Littlechild, Assistant Professor in the Department of Law and Legal Studies at Carleton University.

Chair: Corinne Schuster-Wallace, University of Saskatchewan

Completing the data-to-impact cycle: The Lake Winnipeg Community-Based Monitoring Network

Ms. Chelsea Lobson, Lake Winnipeg Foundation

At the centre of Canada, Lake Winnipeg is the world’s 10th largest freshwater lake, recognized nationally and internationally for its ecologically and culturally important habitats. Over the past century, peoples around Lake Winnipeg have witnessed a concerning decline in the lake’s health. Eutrophication – the over-fertilization of freshwater ecosystems with the nutrient phosphorus – is causing increasingly frequent and severe algal blooms that negatively impact water quality and drinking water, recreation and tourism, subsistence and commercial fisheries, lakeshore economies and ecosystem integrity.

In recent years, much emphasis has been placed on the size and multi-jurisdictional nature of the Lake Winnipeg watershed. Too often, unfortunately, the scale of the watershed serves as an excuse for inaction or as an explanation for slow progress in improving the lake’s water quality. In reality, efforts to address Lake Winnipeg’s algal blooms have simply lacked the relevant and necessary data to ensure their success. Community-based monitoring is now filling this evidence gap.

The Lake Winnipeg Community-Based Monitoring Network (LWCBMN) is a collaborative long-term monitoring program designed specifically to identify localized phosphorus hotspots within the larger Lake Winnipeg watershed. This program builds on past research and complements existing agency monitoring programs to create a robust, continuous data set that enables geographic targeting of phosphorus-reduction efforts. With data shared openly through Lake Winnipeg DataStream, LWCBMN provides the evidence base necessary to improve Lake Winnipeg’s water quality through efficient and cost-effective action.

Engaging Indigenous systems in the context of water

Prof. Danika Littlechild, Carleton University

There are many opportunities and challenges related to engaging Indigenous systems in the context of water in Canada. How should we understand the ideas of reconciliation, Indigenous knowledge, Indigenous rights and responsibilities and their potential interaction with the spheres of science, monitoring, decision-making, and policy development? Danika Billie Littlechild will provide an overview of selected issues, constraints and constructive ideas in the very broad, complex and diverse world of First Nations and water in Canada.




Live Poster Session


Join us for a virtual version of the GWF2021 scientific poster session! Browse through the posters that highlight our scientific research from across the GWF program and the conference’s five main themes. You will be able to enter a live chat room with poster authors for one-on-one discussions, or leave a comment or a message for the poster author.

Click here to view today’s featured posters and enter the chat rooms

Click here for Day 1 posters

Click here for Day 3 posters

Posters will be available for viewing throughout the entire GWF2021 conference.




PARALLEL SESSION 1 – Mechanistic Modelling under Future Climates


VIEW ON-DEMAND HERE

Session convener: Martyn Clark (University of Saskatchewan)

Conference theme: Climate-driven changes of water environments in cold regions

Overview:

This session aims to showcase the recent science progress made by the GWF Core Modelling and Forecasting Team. The particular focus is on the hydrological process understanding through process-based mechanistic modelling. Four signature research areas will be highlighted in this session. The first topic is on advances in spatial-meteorological forcing data, where the recent developments in both global and regional forcing data will be presented. The second topic will focus on improvements in process representation in hydrological models, and specifically emphasize the role of permafrost and precipitation phase change in hydrological modelling. The third topic will deal with hydrological modelling of large-domain river basins in Canada, along with their applications in simulating hydrological responses under future climate. The final topic will address model extensions and bring in human dimensions (water management) and river ice. Advances in all these individual model components (e.g., forcing data, process representation, model extensions, and applications for scenario analysis) will strengthen the overall modelling framework, and assist in adapting to change and managing risks of uncertain water futures and extreme events.

Agenda and Speakers:

1:30pm: Introduction. Chair: Martyn Clark, University of Saskatchewan.

1:35pm: Water balance analysis of the Saskatchewan River Basin using MESH model. Fuad Yassin, University of Saskatchewan.

1:45pm: Advances in Permafrost Modelling: Enhancing MESH/CLASS to represent Permafrost Dynamics. Mohamed Elshamy, University of Saskatchewan.

1:55pm: Continental-scale convection-permitting regional climate modeling and future climate projection for Western Canada. Yanping Li, University of Saskatchewan.

2:05pm: EM-Earth: The Ensemble Meteorological Dataset for Planet Earth. Guoqiang Tang, University of Saskatchewan.

2:15pm: Impacts of future climate on the hydrology of Saint John River Basin. Sujata Budhathoki, University of Saskatchewan.

2:25pm: Advances River ice modelling. Karl-Erich Lindenschmidt, University of Saskatchewan.

2:35pm: New insights on precipitation phase change. Julie Theriault, Université du Québec à Montréal.

2:45pm: Advances in large-domain water resources modelling. Tricia Stadnyk, University of Calgary.

2:55pm: Closing.




GWF-YP Workshop – Meeting the Data Management Expectations of GWF and Beyond: Practical Advice for HQP


Overview:

This workshop will provide practical information to assist researchers in meeting the data management expectations of GWF and beyond. Data management expectations of graduate students and young professionals come from a variety of sources (publishers, funders, supervisors), and the steps to meet these expectations is often unclear. This workshop will address data management within GWF with a primary focus on publication requirements (data availability statements, dataset publication and DOIs) and a brief overview of the steps to get there (data management plans, metadata, and journaling). A demonstration on how to publish data on the Federated Research Data Repository (FRDR) will be provided. Resources and the supports available to HQP, including those offered by the GWF DM team will be discussed.

Speakers: GWF Data Management Team members Krysha Dukacz (McMaster University) and Amber Peterson (University of Saskatchewan)




Social Event – Virtual Water Art Gallery


Art can be a powerful tool to share knowledge and encourage conversation. Join us and be inspired by the GWF Virtual Water Gallery (www.virtualwatergallery.ca), an online art and science exhibit that explores the water challenges we face. Chat with the artists and water experts about their co-creative experience with merging art and science to produce powerful visuals that spark discussion and strengthens scientific communication.




PARALLEL SESSION 2 – Valuing Canada’s Water Resources and Aquatic Ecosystem Services


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Session conveners: Roy Brouwer (University of Waterloo), Patrick Lloyd-Smith (University of Saskatchewan)

Conference theme: Turning research into policy and management solutions

Overview:

This session aims to kick off the GWF project “What is Water Worth?”. The focus of this session will be to: (1) take stock of what we know about the value of Canada’s water resources; (2) examine how these water resources can be valued; and, (3) discuss how we can advance the integration of these values into Canadian water policy and decision-making.

Agenda and Speakers:

1:30pm: Opening and introduction to new GWF project “What is Water Worth?”. Prof. Roy Brouwer, University of Waterloo.

1:35pm: What is water worth in Canada? Prof. Roy Brouwer, University of Waterloo.

1:50pm: Water Valuation in Canada: Past, Present, and Future. Diane Dupont, Brock University.

2:05pm: Quantifying the economic value of water quality through behaviour. Patrick Lloyd-Smith, University of Saskatchewan.

2:20pm: Operationalizing ECCC’s Water Quality Valuation Model. Rute Pinto, University of Waterloo.

2:35pm: Discussion on Moving the water valuation agenda in Canada forward.

2:50pm: Closing.




PARALLEL SESSION 3 – Innovations in Data Science and Artificial Intelligence


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Session convener: Jimmy Lin (University of Waterloo)

Conference theme: Innovations in water science and technology

Overview:

This session will showcase recent advances at the intersection of data science and artificial intelligence. Data-driven techniques that take advantage of machine learning – specifically, neural networks – have recently made enormous strides in problems such as streamflow prediction. We will provide an overview of results from the third phase of the Great Lakes Runoff Intercomparison Projects (GRIP), which examined 17 hydrologic and land-surface models on the Lake Erie watershed, including those based on neural networks. Additional follow-up work demonstrates that a single neural network can provide models at different timescales. The success of data-driven machine-learned models critically depends on conveniently accessible, high-quality data, for example, meteorological forcings. Thus, successful machine learning solutions based on artificial intelligence must be broadly considered holistically in a data science framework. That is, tools for storing, integrating, accessing, and analyzing large environmental datasets are just as important as the machine learning models and toolkits themselves. To this end, we present discrete global grid systems (DGGS), which provide an underlying data model for rapid computation without need for traditional image or geometric/geographic data types.

Agenda and Speakers:

1:30pm: Welcome

1:35pm: Big Data & Artificial Intelligence applications in hydrometeorology. Jimmy Lin, University of Waterloo.

1:55pm: DGGS as a building block of next-generation big-spatial data. Chiranjib Chaudhuri, University of Saskatchewan.

2:15 pm: The Runoff Model-Intercomparison Project over Lake Erie and the Great Lakes. Juliane Mai, University of Waterloo.

2:35 pm: Deep Learning for rainfall-runoff prediction at multiple timescales. Martin Gauch, Johannes Kepler University.

2:55pm: Discussion and wrap up.




PARALLEL SESSION 5 – Indigenous Water Governance and Justice


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Session conveners: Dawn Martin-Hill (McMaster University), Lawrence Martz (University of Saskatchewan)

Session theme: Knowledge co-creation with Indigenous communities

Overview:

These sessions seek to highlight the lessons learned and best practices involved with conducting Indigenous knowledge and community-led research that is co-created by both academic and community leads. By drawing on the current GWF Indigenous research projects, the sessions will feature the realities of conducting co-creation research with Indigenous communities. Real-world takeaways from ongoing projects will advance Indigenous knowledge research and lead towards a water-secure future for Indigenous communities. Successful partnerships with Indigenous communities include co-creation of the study design, centering community leadership in the implementation of data collection, appropriately training youth and graduate students, co-creating knowledge mobilization dissemination tools, and the optimization of traditional ecological knowledge for environmental and human health outcomes. As the second of three sessions, this session will discuss best practices in Indigenous water governance and justice, highlighting examples from the Matawa Water Futures: Developing an Indigenous-Informed Framework for Watershed Monitoring and Stewardship and Is our Water Good to Drink? Water-Related Practices, Perceptions and Traditional Knowledge Indicators for Human Health projects. True partnership requires mutual respect and trust, and when achieved, both academic researchers and the community will benefit.

Agenda and Speakers:

1:30pm: Welcoming remarks. Chair: Beverly Jacobs, University of Windsor.

1:40pm: Remarks from Traditional Knowledge Keeper. Louise McDonald, Mohawk Nation, Akwesasne.

1:50pm: Remarks from GWF Knowledge Co-Creation Community and Academic Experts.

Diane Giroux, AAROM Coordinator, Akaitcho Territory Government and Corinne Schuster-Wallace, University of Saskatchewan (Is our Water Good to Drink? Water-Related Practices, Perceptions and Traditional Knowledge Indicators for Human Health)

Nidhi Nagabhatla, McMaster University and United Nations University (CRIS) (Ohneganos: Indigenous ecological knowledge, training and co-creation of mixed method tools)

Erin Desjardins, Matawa First Nations and Kelly Munkittrick, University of Calgary (Matawa Water Futures: Developing an Indigenous-Informed Framework for Watershed Monitoring and Stewardship)

2:20pm: Summarizing remarks. Chair: Beverly Jacobs, University of Windsor.

2:30pm. Open dialogue.





Day 3

Morning Plenary Panel Discussion, Part One – The Role of Science and Policy in Securing Canada’s Water Future


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We will examine Canada’s water future at the interface of policy and science. Hear from scientific and policy experts at municipal, regional, federal and transnational levels on how water research and science fit into the policy landscape for determining Canada’s water future. What are the policy priorities for securing Canada’s water future? What’s needed from scientists and researchers to help shape Canadian water policy? How can we better connect science and research with decision-makers and policy processes? How do we best consider Canada’s water security needs within a binational context?

Moderator:

Sean Carey, Professor at the School of Earth, Environment & Society, McMaster University

Panellists:

Mike Schreiner, MPP Guelph, Leader Green Party of Ontario

Javier Gracia-Garza, Special Advisor, Agriculture and Climate Change, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Shawn Marshall, Departmental Science Advisor, Environment and Climate Change Canada; Professor, Department of Geography, University of Calgary

Lou Di Gironimo, General Manager, Toronto Water, City of Toronto

Crystal Davis, Vice President of Policy & Strategic Engagement, Alliance for the Great Lakes




Afternoon Plenary Panel Discussion, Part Two – Collective Solutions for Securing Canada’s Water Future


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We will examine Canada’s water future from the perspective of stakeholders from the broader water community in Canada. Hear from leaders and experts from various organizations representing industry, NGOs and community-based organizations, for a discussion on how diverse actors are shaping Canada’s water future. What role do stakeholders play in carving a path forward – industry, NGOs, Indigenous communities, and citizen science? What are the opportunities and challenges faced by stakeholders in building a sustainable water future for Canada? How can different stakeholders and communities work together, and what is needed to foster collaboration?

Moderator:

Jennifer Baltzer, Associate Professor in Biology, and Canada Research Chair in Forests and Global Change, Wilfrid Laurier University

Panellists:

Kat Kavanagh, Founder and Executive Director of Water Rangers

Kelsey Leonard, Assistant Professor, University of Waterloo

Liz Hendriks, Vice President - Restoration and Regeneration, World Wildlife Fund-Canada

Sondus Jamal, Co-Chair for University of Waterloo Students of the Water Institute Graduate Section (SWIGS)

Mark Fisher, Chief Executive Officer, Council of the Great Lakes Region




Live Poster Session


Join us for a virtual version of the GWF2021 scientific poster session! Browse through the posters that highlight our scientific research from across the GWF program and the conference’s five main themes. You will be able to enter a live chat room with poster authors for one-on-one discussions, or leave a comment or a message for the poster author. Click here to view today’s featured posters and enter the chat rooms Click here for Day 1 posters Click here for Day 2 posters

Posters will be available for viewing throughout the entire GWF2021 conference.




PARALLEL SESSION 1 – Groundwater as a Cause and Cure of Water Insecurity


VIEW ON-DEMAND HERE

Session conveners: Andrea Brookfield (University of Waterloo), Grant Ferguson (University of Saskatchewan)

Conference theme: Climate-driven changes of water environments in cold regions

Overview:

Water security is threatened by climate change and increased water demands in many areas of the world. In numerous cold regions, changes in the timing and magnitude of streamflow are altering water availability. These changes have important implications for the agricultural sector, energy security, and natural resource development. Increased use of groundwater resources is often considered a resource to mitigate this problem, but the extent to which these resources could be sustainably developed is often unclear. Some regions currently relying upon groundwater have extensive groundwater and streamflow depletion as a result of unsustainable groundwater management practices, exacerbating the water security issue. In this session, we aim to highlight ongoing work that investigates how groundwater can help ensure future water security, and how our dependence on this resource may also be the cause of water insecurity.

Agenda and Speakers:

1:30pm: Introductory remarks. Chair: Grant Ferguson, University of Saskatchewan.

1:35pm: Invited keynote talk. Groundwater resources in thawing cold regions. Jeffrey McKenzie, McGill University.

1:55pm: Assessing groundwater vulnerability to geogenic contamination in permafrost regions. Elliot Skierszkan, University of Saskatchewan.

2:05pm: Variability in timing and transport of Pleistocene meltwater recharge to regional aquifers. Aidan Mowat, University of Saskatchewan.

2:15pm: The hydrogeology of the Intermediate Zone. Blake Woroniuk, University of Saskatchewan.

2:25pm: Significance of groundwater dynamics within hydrologic models. Xin Tong, University of Waterloo.

2:35pm: Impacts of process sequence on parameter identification, groundwater representation and predictive uncertainty in conceptual hydrological models. Befekadu Taddesse Woldegiorgis, University of Saskatchewan.

2:45pm: Assessing trends in baseflow across Canada. Ethan McTavish, University of Waterloo.

2:55pm: Concluding remarks.




GWF2021 Closing


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A wrap-up GWF2021 with a brief summary and highlights from the three days of the program, followed by an Indigenous closing.

Wrap-up: Dr. John Pomeroy, Director, Global Water Futures

Indigenous Closing: Elder Roland Duquette, Mistawasis First Nation




PARALLEL SESSION 2 – Managing Urban Water Challenges in a Changing Climate: 1:30pm-3:00pm EDT


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Session conveners: Philippe Van Cappellen (University of Waterloo), Helen Jarvie (University of Waterloo)

Conference theme: From anthropogenic pressures to ecosystem services

Overview:

The unprecedented rate and scale of urbanization over the last few decades have highlighted the role of cities as drivers of environmental change. Urban landscapes, with their impervious surfaces, increase surface runoff volumes and flashiness, contributing to urban flood risks, which are increasingly compounded by climate change. Urban runoff mobilizes contaminants, which cause deterioration of urban water bodies, and impair the quality and ecological health of downstream rivers, lakes and coastal zones. This session will explore the pressing challenges in urban stormwater and water-quality management and present new insights in urban ecohydrology from the GWF program. New monitoring technologies and modelling strategies are advancing our capacity to analyze and predict stormwater dynamics at increasing temporal resolution. This session will consider how managing urban stormwater at source, through low-impact development and improvements in stormwater infrastructure, can contribute to climate adaptation and deliver multiple benefits by reducing flood risk and improving water quality within cities and downstream receiving water bodies.

This session features an invited talk by Dr. Max Mauer, Professor at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH-Zürich. Dr. Maurer is the Director of the Institute for Environmental Engineering and heads the Department of Urban Water Management at the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science & Technology, Eawag. Dr. Maurer’s research focusses on sustainable urban water management. His talk will be followed by a series of lightning talks provided by junior GWF researchers. The session will end with a panel discussion with practitioners and stakeholders focussing on current and emerging challenges for sustainable urban water management in Canada.

Agenda and Speakers:

1:30pm: Opening and welcome. Chairs: Philippe Van Cappellen, University of Waterloo; Helen Jarvie, University of Waterloo.

1:35pm: Finally breaking free from the ancient Romans: The interdisciplinary challenges of modern urban water management. Dr. Max Mauer, ETH-Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich).

2:15pm: Lightning talks. Mahyar Shafii, University of Waterloo; Jovana Radosavljevic, University of Waterloo; Tariq Aziz, University of Waterloo.

2:25pm: Panel discussion: Sustainable urban water management in Canada.

Panellists:

Bu Lam, Director, Sanitary and Stormwater Utilities, City of Kitchener

Krista Chomicki, Great Lakes Scientist, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority.

Bernadette Conant, Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Water Network

Pradeep Goal, Research Scientist, Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks




PARALLEL SESSION 3 – Water, Agriculture and Wetlands


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Session conveners: Chris Spence (University of Saskatchewan), Merrin Macrae (University of Waterloo), Colin Whitfield (University of Saskatchewan)

Conference theme: Turning research into policy and management solutions

Overview:

This combination presentation and discussion session will focus on communicating the outcomes from the first three years (2017-2020) of the Prairie Water and Agricultural Water Futures projects, and how best to mobilize these outcomes into effective policy and management recommendations and tools during the second half of the projects (2020-2023). The session will begin with short overview talks summarizing overarching research outcomes. These will be followed by a group discussion about the applicability of the research, potential synergies between Agricultural Water Futures and Prairie Water that could lead to deliverables that build upon successes, and existing gaps in research, tool development and knowledge mobilization efforts.

Agenda and Speakers:

1:30pm: Opening

1:35pm: When Agrohydrology meets Critical Zone science: new progress and perspectives. Ying Zhao, University of Saskatchewan.

1:45 pm: Sensitivity of Prairie Pothole Basin Snow Hydrology to Climate Change. Zhihua He, University of Saskatchewan.

1:55pm: Understanding crop growth under persistent water limitations on the Canadian Prairies: A water balance perspective. Phillip Harder, University of Saskatchewan

2:05 pm: Phosphorus Runoff from Canadian Agricultural Land: A Pan-Canadian Synthesis. Jian Liu, University of Saskatchewan.

2:15 pm: When wetlands disappear, what happens? An approach for assessing changes to ecosystem services using integrated models of hydrology, biogeochemistry and biodiversity. Emily Cavaliere, University of Saskatchewan.

2:25 pm: Panel Discussion: Mobilization of Research for Policy

Panellists:

Corie White, Saskatchewan Water Security Agency.

Jane Elliot, Environment and Climate Change Canada.

Pamela Joosse, Agriculture and Agri-food Canada.

Richard Grosshans, International Institute for Sustainable Development.




PARALLEL SESSION 4 – Improved Tools for Prediction of Water Futures


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Session conveners: Al Pietroniro (University of Calgary), Philippe Van Cappellen (University of Waterloo)

Conference theme: Innovations in water science and technology

Overview:

This session aims to showcase the recent science progress made by the GWF Core Modelling and Forecasting Team, with a particular focus on Innovation in water science and technology. New modelling tools and methods that have been developed or are under active development that can address the increased need for and access to data-supported information and advanced analytics will be emphasized. There will be four sub-themes under this session. The first sub-theme will deal with collaborative flood forecasting in Canada, highlighting both the learning from engagement with stakeholders as well as development of continental-domain seasonal forecasting models. The second sub-theme focuses on new hydrological modelling capabilities from model agnostic frameworks to the next generation models. The remaining two sub-themes will delve into water quality modelling. The third sub-theme will address non-point source, in-stream water quality modelling, whereas the final sub-theme will tackle water quality in lakes, and particularly the issue of nitrogen legacies and roles of nutrients in algal blooms. All these new modelling tools will improve our capacity to predict water futures in order to ensure water security (both quantity and quality) in Canada and beyond.

Agenda and Speakers:

1:30pm: Introduction. Chair: Al Pietroniro, University of Calgary.

1:35pm: Summary and reflection from 2nd Canadian National Flood Forecasting Forum. Al Pietroniro, University of Calgary.

1:45pm: Quantifying streamflow predictability across North America on sub-seasonal to seasonal timescales. Louise Arnal, University of Saskatchewan.

1:55pm: Simulating multi-scale hydrological processes with the Canadian Hydrological Model (CHM). Chris Marsh, University of Saskatchewan.

2:05pm: Facilitating reproducible science: a workflow for setting up SUMMA simulations anywhere on the globe. Wouter Knoben, University of Saskatchewan.

2:15pm: Assessing the sensitivity of daily stream temperature simulations to model parameters and hydrological configurations. Luca Fabris, McMaster University.

2:25pm: Towards Next Generation water quality models through the coupling of flexible hydro-biogeochemical frameworks to well-established cold regions hydrological models. Diogo Costa, Environment and Climate Change Canada.

2:35pm: Nitrogen legacy. Kimberly Van Meter, University of Illinois at Chicago.

2:45pm: Lake nutrient cycling and algal productivity: multi-scale drivers and controls. Philippe Van Cappellen, University of Waterloo.

2:55pm: Closing.




PARALLEL SESSION 5 – Co-creating Research to Advance Access to Clean Water in Indigenous Communities


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Session conveners: Dawn Martin-Hill (McMaster University), Lawrence Martz (University of Saskatchewan)

Session theme: Knowledge co-creation with Indigenous communities

Overview:

These sessions seek to highlight the lessons learned and best practices involved with conducting Indigenous knowledge and community-led research that is co-created by both academic and community leads. By drawing on the current GWF Indigenous research projects, the sessions will feature the realities of conducting co-creation research with Indigenous communities. Real-world takeaways from ongoing projects will advance Indigenous knowledge research and lead towards a water-secure future for Indigenous communities. Successful partnerships with Indigenous communities include co-creation of the study design, centering community leadership in the implementation of data collection, appropriately training youth and graduate students, co-creating knowledge mobilization dissemination tools, and the optimization of traditional ecological knowledge for environmental and human health outcomes. As the third of three sessions, this session will discuss best practices in co-creating research to advance access to clean water in Indigenous communities, highlighting examples from the FIShNET (Fish & IndigenouS NorthErn health) Healthy Water, Healthy Fish, Healthy People Stewardship and We need more than just water: Assessing sediment limitation in a large freshwater delta projects. True partnership requires mutual respect and trust, and when achieved, both academic researchers and the community will benefit.

Agenda and Speakers:

1:30pm: Welcome and introduction. Chair: Michelle Johnson-Jennings, University of Saskatchewan, Choctaw Nation.

1:40pm: Remarks from Traditional Knowledge Keeper. Judy Da Silva, Asubpeeschoseewagong Netum Anishinabek (Grassy Narrows First Nation).

1:50pm: Remarks from GWF Knowledge Co-Creation Community and Academic Experts.

Gary Carriere, Cumberland House Fishermen’s Co-operative (We need more than just water: Assessing sediment limitation in a large freshwater delta)

Tim Jardine, University of Saskatchewan (We need more than just water: Assessing sediment limitation in a large freshwater delta)

Anthony Johnston, University of Saskatchewan, Mistawasis Nêhiyawak.

Dawn Martin-Hill, McMaster University (Ohneganos: Indigenous ecological knowledge, training and co-creation of mixed method tools)

2:20pm: Summarizing remarks. Chair: Michelle Johnson-Jennings, University of Saskatchewan.

2:30pm. Open dialogue.